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Conservative election manifesto: Here's what we know so far

19 May 2017

At least 100 leading private schools will be expected to sponsor academies or set up free schools if the Conservative Party wins the election.

Plans to scrap a 2015 commitment not to raise income tax, VAT or national insurance are also being discussed.

The 84-page manifesto, unveiled in Halifax, West Yorkshire, is the clearest exposition yet of "Mayism" - a working-class conservatism openly critical of the "cult of individualism" and globalization, with stricter rules on foreign company takeovers and immigration, and sweeping commitments to redistribute wealth from London and the south-east to other parts of the country.

"I am determined to cut the cost of living for ordinary working families, keep taxes low and to intervene when markets are not working as they should", May wrote in The Sun, Britain's most popular newspaper.

In its manifesto launched today, the party added it would extend the ability of The Pension Regulator (TPR) and schemes to scrutinise and block corporate takeovers, as well as make it a criminal offence for company boards to deliberately or recklessly underfund a pension scheme.

Wealthy pensioners will lose up to £300 in winter fuel payments under plans to means-test the "perk" to free up funds for social care. Under the Tory plans, that will only be available for the poorest OAPs.

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Under the current system, care costs can deplete an individual's assets, including in some cases the family home, down to £23,250 or even less with no protection.

Now only those going into care homes have the value of their property taken into account when paying for care.

"I'm very surprised that there is such specific information that appears to be new thinking, that I'd argue shows a less than full understanding of the problems", Dilnot told the BBC.

It adds: 'We will work with train companies and their employees to agree minimum service levels during periods of industrial dispute - and if we can not find a voluntary agreement, we will legislate to make this mandatory'.

He said: "It's a bit like saying you can't insure your house against burning down".

The Liberal Democrats have branded Mrs May the "lunch snatcher" after her plan to end another coalition policy, the introduction of universal free school lunches for all infants.

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May is often compared to Britain's only other female prime minister, Margaret Thatcher, who transformed the country with pro-market policies that came to be dubbed "Thatcherism".

A Conservative spokesman said: 'We have protected and increased school funding to the highest level on record but we accept there is more we can do'. The farcical scenes in March further highlighted the urgency around the need for extra money. Now more than ever, Britain needs a strong and stable leadership to make the most of the opportunities that Brexit brings.

She said: "The next five years are the most challenging that Britain has faced in my lifetime".

If she wins on June 8, May will have one of the toughest jobs of any recent British prime minister: holding the United Kingdom and its economy together while conducting arduous divorce talks with European Union leaders on the intricacies of finance, trade, security and immigration.

There are as yet unconfirmed reports that the manifesto will also call on businesses to pay more if they hire migrant workers.

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Conservative election manifesto: Here's what we know so far