Monday, 18 December 2017
Latest news
Main » Britain's May Confident on Deal to Stay in Power

Britain's May Confident on Deal to Stay in Power

19 June 2017

THE TORIES HAVE been told that forming a government with the DUP could jeopardise the peace process in Northern Ireland.

Representatives of then-Prime Minister David Cameron and Chancellor George Osborne met senior figures in the DUP for secret talks after the 2015 election - where pollsters had incorrectly predicted a hung Parliament.

Deputy Leader Nigel Dodds is leading the DUP delegation to London as party leader Arlene Foster has returned to Northern Ireland, the spokesman said.

A secret deal outlining what would happen in the event of a hung Parliament was drawn up between the Conservatives and the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) following the 2015 general election, a leaked document has revealed. The government announced on Thursday, however, that the queen's speech, which outlines its legislative agenda, will go ahead next Wednesday.

The Prime Minister is to hold talks with political leaders from Northern Ireland in a bid to allay fears the anticipated parliamentary deal with the Democratic Unionists will undermine the peace process.

No DUP deal but Queen's Speech date confirmed
The Queen's Speech, which outlines the Government's policies for the parliamentary session, will take place on Wednesday 21 June. She announced the delay in a tweet Thursday , confirming earlier reports that the event would be pushed back.

Her failure to win a majority has put May under pressure over her Brexit plans from inside and outside her party and has prompted complaints about her choice of partner due to the DUP's stance on social issues such as gay marriage and abortion.

On Brexit, Ms Foster said her party wanted to see "a sensible Brexit and one that works for everybody".

But speaking in Dublin after a meeting with the new Taoiseach Leo Varadkar, the DUP leader Arlene Foster said it was down to Sinn Fein whether an agreement is reached.

Ministers have already said that the Queen's Speech may have to be set back from its scheduled date of next Monday June 19, because of the ongoing negotiations.

"And we told her very directly that she was in breach of the Good Friday Agreement and we itemized those matters in which she was dilatory or in default in relation to that agreement", the Guardian reported.

Real Madrid: Cristiano will prove innocence over tax allegations
Real Madrid said in a statement it had "full trust" in its player, who they believe has "complied with his fiscal obligations". Ronaldo earned £72 million from salary, bonuses and endorsements in 2016 and is now the world's highest-paid sportsperson.

May's programme will most probably have to be watered down, dropping some of her preferred reforms to help get legislation through Parliament and possibly having to give way to other ministers who have strong views over the direction of Brexit.

Tories have made clear since last week's election that their discussions with the DUP revolve around assurances of support in key Commons votes, rather than a full coalition.

He said that he believed that if a deal is reached, the government "will not be seen to be impartial" which will create problems for communities in the North.

The British government was due to begin Brexit talks with the European Union on Monday.

May has dismissed calls to resign following the dismal election result after calling a vote three years early in the hope of bolstering her slim majority, only to actually lose seats.

London Police Treat Mosque Attack as Terrorist Incident
The incident comes at a time when emotions are high in the United Kingdom , in the wake of a series of deadly terrorist attacks. London police say one suspect has been detained in an apparent early-morning attack on worshippers standing outside a mosque.

"Look at what the Tories [Conservatives] have managed to do to the United Kingdom in the space of just one year, firstly calling a divisive and reckless European Union referendum. then having lost that gamble pursuing a hard Brexit path", Scotland's first minister, Nicola Sturgeon, said.